Ready and raring to go!

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Finished cleaning and setting up all 8 tanks! These will house 24 pods. But, each will be separated from its neighbours because otherwise there’ll be many boxing matches! Stomatopods tend to not get along very well together. Can’t wait to get the new pods in the lab next week!

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I blogged for Tufts Grad School!

I have recently started blogging for the Tufts Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. They have a few grad students blogging about life at Tufts. The aim is to give potential new grad students an inside look into grad life at Tufts. It’s fun to have a platform to write about what I’ve experienced throughout my PhD. There’s lots of fun stuff on offer to either make sure you take a break from research (e.g. Star Wars screening – sorry in advance for the terrible pun) or give you skills to get through grad school with flying colours and secure a job afterwards (check out my Workshops post).

Hope you find them interesting.

My next letter from a pre-scientist!

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This year a joined a program called Letters to a Pre-Scientist. It’s so fantastic! I receive letters from a middle schooler and write back to them about science and other things (because scientists can still have a life outside of science!). I’ve been matched with a student interested in marine science, and I love writing to her about exciting marine facts!

The aim of the program is to “empower middle school students from under-resourced communities to pursue careers in science and technology” (from the Letters to a Pre-Scientist webpage). I think it’s a great idea and I love receiving letters every couple of months.

Stomatopod egg

I had to copy this tweet from the Lund Vision Group because the photo is so amazing! It’s a mantis shrimp developing in an egg. You can see the compound eye developing (the browny part over the yellow yolk). Getting a better understanding of the development of the stomatopod eye would be fascinating since their vision is so complex. If you don’t already know, stomatopods have up to 20 photoreceptors and can detect UV, visible, linearly polarised and circularly polarised light.

If you’re interested in more amazing mantis shrimp photos, check out Dr Michael Bok’s webpage.